Puerto Teide Bike Climb - PJAMM Cycling






Puerto Teide

Spain

Longest climb in Spain

Page Contributor(s): Ard Oostra, Switzerland

Explore this Climb

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LOCAL WEATHER

Start
Finish

Currently

pjamm cycling clear-day weather icon
64
°F
°C

Clear


wind:
8 mph N with gusts up to 18.1 mph

rain:
3% chance of light rainfall

4:22 PM (local)
PJAMM Sunrise Icon7:09 AMPJAMM Sunset Icon7:19 PM

Temperature
Precipitation
Wind Speed

Fri

pjamm cycling partly-cloudy-day weather icon

64° 58°

Sat

pjamm cycling partly-cloudy-day weather icon

64° 57°

Sun

pjamm cycling partly-cloudy-day weather icon

63° 57°

Mon

pjamm cycling cloudy weather icon

59° 56°

Tue

pjamm cycling partly-cloudy-day weather icon

62° 58°

Wed

pjamm cycling partly-cloudy-day weather icon

63° 58°

Thu

pjamm cycling partly-cloudy-day weather icon

63° 58°

Climb Summary


Climb Summary

Grades.JPG 

PJAMM will ride and document this climb in June, 2018.  We have confirmed with several Strava members who have ridden this climb that it can be done on a road bike:

Karl Pae Yap, I didn't come across any gravel roads in Tenerife. All main roads are nicely paved including the climb up to Teide! Enjoy:)

Elke Witters Hello John this segment is paved. I did it with a road bike.


Stephen Collett The road takes you to 2500 meters;  The rest can be done via cable car or by walking.

Cyclefiesta.com says of this climb:

This is arguably the most challenging ascent of El Teide. Unlike the other routes, it does not have an appreciable downhill section and so it is nearly 47km of pure climbing.

The gradient is gentle and is fairly consistent, hovering around 6% for much of the ascent - but it certainly adds up and requires a good level of endurance. There is also a tough stretch early on during the climb, shortly before the town of La Orotava, where the gradient kicks up to 16%.

Roads & Traffic

The first part of the climb, between Puerto de la Cruz and La Orotava can be quite busy in places. However, it is generally wide and with a hard shoulder which means that the traffic is not particularly bothersome.

After La Orotava the number of cars reduces, although it doesn't become non-existent. Towards the top of the climb, where all of the routes meet, it become slightly busier again. On public holidays and in the main tourist season, expect an increase in the amount of traffic - in winter there is considerably less.”  
Cyclefiesta.com