Red Mountain Pass South Bike Climb - PJAMM Cycling

4
FIETS
9.9 mi
DISTANCE
1,681 ft
GAINED
3.2 %
AVG. GRADE

FULL CLIMB STATS

INTRO

This 9.9 mile bike climb is located in San Juan County, Colorado, USA. The average gradient is 3.2% and there is a total elevation gain of 1,681 ft, finishing at 10,933 ft.

Use the profile tool, route map, and weather forecast to conquer this cycling climb.

See more details and tools regarding this climb's grade via our interactive Profile Tool.
Information Not Available

If you have any information regarding this climb, we'd like to hear from you. Click the CONTRIBUTE button to share your thoughts with us.

Information Not Available

If you have any information regarding this climb, we'd like to hear from you. Click the CONTRIBUTE button to share your thoughts with us.

Information Not Available

If you have any information regarding this climb, we'd like to hear from you. Click the CONTRIBUTE button to share your thoughts with us.

ROUTE MAP

MEMBER RATING

Not Yet Rated
-
Road
-
Traffic
-
Scenery

CURRENT WEATHER

NEARBY CLIMBS (0) RADIAL PROXIMITY

FROM
No Climbs Found

MEMBER REVIEWS & COMMENTS

Let us know what you thought of this climb. Signup for our FREE membership to write a review or post a comment.
Already have an account?
ROUTE MAP
PROFILE TOOL

Climb Profile Not Found
CLIMB SUMMARY

Cycling Red Mountain Pass from Silverton (south)

Ride 9.9 miles gaining 1,681’ at 3.2% average grade.

Although much less difficult and a bit less scenic than Red Mountain Pass North, this climb is fun, beautiful and well worth the effort.

Climb begins in Silverton in southwestern Colorado.

Silverton is, you guessed it, a former silver mining camp which was designated as a National Historic Landmark District in 1961.

“ The town is situated at the center of the San Juan mining district.  Prospecting began in the 1860s, but it was not until 1871 that the first profitable silver vein was discovered in nearby Arrastra Gulch.  The late 19th and early 20th century residential and institutional buildings within the district reflect the prosperity brought about by one of Colorado’s richest mineral producing regions.”  Historycolorado.org