Pea Royd Lane (SW #41) Bike Climb - PJAMM Cycling

2.3
FIETS
0.7 mi
DISTANCE
522 ft
GAINED
14.3 %
AVG. GRADE

FULL CLIMB STATS

INTRO

Pea Royd Lane is a short and stout climb (14.2% average grade) beginning in the industrial town of Stocksbridge. This is the second steepest 100 GCC above 1 km. The climb is well known as there is an annual hill climb in September each year, and it has twice hosted the British Hill Climb Championships. 

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CLIMB SUMMARY

Cycling Pea Royd Lane - bike with PJAMM Cycling jersey draped over it, leaning against road sign for Pea Royd Lane, along brush covered stone fence line                                                                                                                                      

Pea Royd Lane is well known to British cycling climbers.  This brief and brutal hill climb hosted the British National Hill Climb Championships in 2009 (Dan Fleeman wins) and 2014 (Dan Evans tops the podium).

Dan Evans 2014 championship ride.

Photos:  Left - Dan Fleeman (Bike Radar);

Right - Dan Evans (average watts 543/maximum 1,005) (Cycling Weekly).

The 1100 meter ascent is also home to the annual Stocksbridge CC Hill Climb (formerly Thurcroft CC Hill Climb, as referred to in 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs, Britain, p. 76).

Why is Pea Royd such a “popular” (deadly?) climb?  Check its profile on our climb page -- it is a brute at 14.2% average grade with three brutal sections of (a) 18.1% for 60 meters beginning at 400 m, (b) 160 meters of 16.9% beginning at 600 m, and the punch in the stomach final stretch of 24.4% for 100 m to the finish, with the last 20 meters equalling 27.5%.

Cycling Pea Royd Lane - bike with PJAMM Cycling jersey draped over it, leaning against tall eroded rock/dirt walls lining narrow one-lane roadway

Looking back at 27.5% final stretch.

The climb begins at the northern edge of Stockbridge.  The 2017 Tour de Yorkshire had a stage finish in Stockbridge (stage winner Serge Pauwels, Belgium).

Cycling Pea Royd Lane - sign for the Finish Line of Tour de Yorkshire in a car parking lot, PJAMM Cycling logo in corner

Finish of the final Stage (3) of Tour de Yorkshire in Stonebridge.

 

Steepest ½ kilometer begins at 600 meters (16.6%).

The climb begins at the northern edge of the small town of Stocksbridge, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England (pop. 9,869, 2011).  Stockbridge lies within the Little Don River’s steep-sided valley and below the Underbank Reservoir  (Stocksbridge).  To plan your visit to this area, check out this list of top 10 things to do in Stocksbridge.

Climbing Cyclist:

“Pea Royd Lane has been the venue for the national hill climb championships in 2009 and will be the venue in 2014. It is a classic hill climb length- relatively short and steep with a few sharp corners to make it really testing.  The gradient is variable from fairly shallow at the bottom to a gradient of up to 20% near the top.”

100 Hills for George:

“The next climb was a little outside of Sheffield, near Stocksbridge and Simon talks about the climb taking you from "industrial valley to peaceful moorland" and that it is an incredibly accurate way of putting it. You start your climb right at the bottom of this industrial valley.  

With all these massive rusty steel girders surrounding you,  you hop on the bike and hope that your legs will have the same resilience.  Before hiking yourself up the steep, steep hill. I liked this hill a lot - Simon gives it an 8/10 and it starts fairly steep, as you exit the small town.”