Jackson Bridge (SW #42) Bike Climb - PJAMM Cycling






Jackson Bridge (SW #42)

United Kingdom

All the cycling data and info you'll need to climb Jackson Bridge (SW #42)

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LOCAL WEATHER

Start
Finish

Currently

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61
°F
°C

Mostly Cloudy


wind:
13.3 mph SW with gusts up to 26.3 mph

rain:
4% chance of light rainfall

1:41 PM (local)
PJAMM Sunrise Icon4:38 AMPJAMM Sunset Icon9:40 PM

Temperature
Precipitation
Wind Speed

Mon

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61° 49°

Tue

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64° 51°

Wed

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61° 47°

Thu

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62° 47°

Fri

pjamm cycling partly-cloudy-day weather icon

61° 43°

Sat

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64° 48°

Sun

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64° 51°

Climb Summary


Jackson Bridge Climb Summary

Cycling Jackson Bridge - Simon Warren #42 Greatest Cycling Challenge, Britain  - bike leaning against park bench, town in background 

                                          

The Jackson Bridge climb is named after the small village where the climb begins (pop. 1,380).  The climb is actually on Tenter Hill Road which becomes Scar Hole Lane 400 meters from the start.

This punishing climb is well known to British cycling climbers as it  hosted the British National Hill Climb Championships in 1994  (champion Jeff Wright) and 2015 (Jack Pular).  .

The climb weaves its way for 1400 meters from the intersection of South View/Woodpit/Tenter Hill to the marked “finish” at the end.  There is a stiff 15.7% 100 meters just after the start followed by a 13.6% 170 meters starting at 500 meters and a pitch of 13.8% for the final 170 meters.

Bike climb Jackson Bridge - Simon Warren #42 Greatest Cycling Challenge, Britain  - Road  with finish line painted on it 

Finish line is 50 meters from the true top of the climb.

The road is very narrow but lightly traveled and in great shape.

Bicycle ride Jackson Bridge - Simon Warren #42 Greatest Cycling Challenge, Britain  - road surrounded by trees 

Narrow country lane.

 

 

Steepest ½ kilometer begins at 500 meters (12.5%)

This Simon Warren #42 climb begins in Jackson Bridge (pop. 1,380):

“Jackson Bridge is the location for the pub to which Clegg's is situated behind in the BBC's long-running comedy Last of the Summer Wine. It is located close to the edge of the Peak District National Park.

Dobroyd Mills, which dominates the village, was once a major contributor to the West Yorkshire textile industry, producing fine worsted cloth for export. The mill now houses a fine yarn spinners, John Woodheads (Dobroyd Mills) Ltd, plus other small businesses such as computer services and facilities, engineering, sheet metal works and motor vehicle services. Most of the surrounding countryside is given over to agriculture, significantly milk cattle and sheep.”  
Wikipedia - Jackson Bridge 

100HillsForGeorge.blogspot.com: 

“Jackson Bridge was a proper country ride - any climb that ends with the words "grind it out to the farm at the top" means that you are unlikely to be passed by lots of motor cars!

I'm not sure about riding in isolation totally though - whilst it is nice not to have to worry about wobbling into the path of cars, or hold them up unecessarily, sometimes in your head it is good to have the stimulus of thinking that people are in the car behind me "in awe" of my hill climbing ability (or more likely, wondering why the idiot on the bike is wheezing up a hill so slowly!) Also it can be a big motivator hearing an engine behind you straining as someone keeps it in first gear ready to leap past you!

Jackson Bridge was a 7/10. I think I've worked out in Simon's grading terms that means it is hard work - crossing that threshold from 6/10 seems to mean that it is not a climb to be taken lightly - and I think that is fair in respect of Jackson Bridge.”  
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CyclingUphill.com:

“Jackson Bridge is a classic British hill climb course. Roughly 1 mile at an average gradient of 11%. The climb doesn’t allow a steady rhythm, but has four difficult sections of 15% plus, interspersed with some more gradual gradients in between.”  More