Oxnop Scar (SW #46) Bike Climb - PJAMM Cycling

1.3
FIETS
2.5 mi
DISTANCE
738 ft
GAINED
5.6 %
AVG. GRADE

FULL CLIMB STATS

INTRO

Simon Warren’s #46 Top 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs in Britain -- this climb starts out with its steepest half-kilometer right at the start before tapering down and ultimately averaging a modest 5.7% average grade. At kilometer 3 for several hundred meters on our right is an interesting wall of rock rising above the roadway. This is a remote and very scenic route through pastureland for four full kilometers.  

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CLIMB SUMMARY

Cycling Oxnop Scar - photo looking down over rolling hills at a narrow roadway winding through the hills, pastureland in background, blue sky with white fluffy clouds, Simon Warren's 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs #46 logo in corner

Now THAT’S a fun descent!

Cycling Oxnop Scar - bike leaning against road sign saying "Cattle Grid, Horse Drawn vehicles and animals", road sign on low rock wall saying "High Oxnop", narrow one-lane road winding through pastureland

Oxnop Scar is #46 on Simon Warren’s Top 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs in Britain.  This climb starts out with its steepest half kilometer right away, before tapering down and ultimately averaging a modest 5.7% for its full four kilometers.

Cycling Oxnop Scar - road sign for 25% grade, steep, one-lane road, pastureland and low rock walls dividing pastures, PJAMM Cycling logo in corner

Photo top left: Greetings at the beginning of Oxnop’s Scar!

Cycling Oxnop Scar - various cattle grazing in pastures, cows, horses, PJAMM Cycling logo in corner

Grazing livestock for the first few hundred meters. 

 

At kilometer three for several hundred meters on our right is an interesting wall of rock rising above the roadway; this is the Oxnop Scar.

Cycling Oxnop Scar - aerial view of Oxnop Scar, PJAMM Cycling logo in corner

Steepest ½ kilometer begins at the very beginning of the climb (13.3%).

This climb is in the northern section of Yorkshire Dales National Park (217,800 hectares / 538,195 acres), established in 1954:

“The Yorkshire Dales National Park is a 2,178 km2 (841 sq mi) national park in England covering most of the Yorkshire Dales. The majority of the park is in North Yorkshire, with a sizeable area in Cumbria and a small part in Lancashire. The park was designated in 1954, and was extended in 2016. Over 20,000 residents live and work in the park, which attracts over eight million visitors every year.  The park is 50 miles (80 km) north-east of Manchester; Leeds and Bradford lie to the south, while Kendal is to the west, Darlington to the north-east and Harrogate to the south-east. The national park does not include all of the Yorkshire Dales. Parts of the dales to the south and east of the national park are located in the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty” (Yorkshire Dales National Park). 

Cycling Uphill:

“Oxnop Scar is a climb from Swaledale south towards Wensleydale. Typical of Yorkshire Dales climbs in this part of the world, there is a really steep section of 25%. The steep section is at the bottom, so you will be tired after that for the long remorseless climb towards the top.

The only thing that can be said about the first section is that , traffic permitting, you can take the hairpins wide to reduce the gradient a little. But, it is still quite brutal.

Looking back through some old photos, I found I did this climb a few years ago. In those days, I called it ‘a steep climb in Swaledale’. It was probably done after cycling up Fleet Moss and Buttertubs. The metres ascent can really add up in that part of the world.”