Newlands Hause (SW #81) Bike Climb - PJAMM Cycling

2.5
FIETS
1.2 mi
DISTANCE
711 ft
GAINED
11.5 %
AVG. GRADE

FULL CLIMB STATS

INTRO

This climb begins in the in the small village of Buttermere (pop. 127, 2001) just between lakes Crummock and Buttermere, on an unmarked road that travels to Newlands Hause (also known as Newlands Pass). This is a short but steep climb at 1.9 kilometers averaging 11.2%.   Simon Warren ranks this the 8th most epic hill climb in England (See England's Top 10 Epic Bike Climbs). 

Visit PJAMM's Top 10 Most Epic UK Hill Climb page for photos, summaries and statistics for these climbs.  

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CLIMB SUMMARY

   bike parked on side of the road against road sign for 25% grade

Cycling Newland Pass (Newland Hause), England

Ride 1.2 miles gaining 711’ at 11.5% average grade.

The Newlands Hause climb begins in what is now my favorite corner of England - the Buttermere Lake and surrounding mountains. These tall mountains seem almost out of place - at least in my own image of what England should look like. While the landscape could be mistaken for the Pyrenees mountains in Italy, the climbs in this area have a distinctly English flavor to them. The Newlands Hause climb begins just past the town of Buttermere. From the first to the final meters of the climb, the gradient is tough and the views are stellar. You’ll have a waterfall behind during the opening portion of the climb, with views of many high mountains in the distance. At the finish, there is yet another amazing waterfall, which is also a popular hiking spot. Despite being fairly off the beaten path, this area is frequented by many tourists. There is parking available at the side of the road at the bottom of the climb, as well as a large dirt lot at the summit. Both options are free.

photo collage shows road conditions on a wet day, old country roads and English countryside

photo collage shows perfectly still waters on Crummock Water and Buttermere lakes

Crummock Water and Buttermere lakes are at the start of the climb.

photo collage shows street signs for Buttermere and Keswick

This climb begins in the in the small village of Buttermere (pop. 127) just between lakes Crummock and Buttermere on an unmarked road that travels to Newlands Hause (also known as Newlands Pass).  This is a short but steep climb at 1.2 kilometers averaging 11.5% with steepest quarter-mile at 16% and half-mile at 15.2%.  Most of the climb is between hills and along a creek that takes us to the pass and Moss Force waterfall.  Be prepared from the start as the first 500 yards are at 14%.

photo collage shows small waterfall on lush green mountainside, English countryside

Sour Milk Ghyll at our backs as we begin the climb out of Buttermere.

The odd name comes from the white froth created by its flowing and swirling waters.

photo collage of road conditions and climb views through a canyon

Climb is through a canyon most of the way.

one-lane country road, green pastureland, blue sky

This climb is in the Lake District and included annually in the Fred Whitton Saddle Back Challenge, one of the most popular sportives in the UK.  See the PJAMM Fred Whitton Challenge Climb Page for more information.

photo collage shows bright green hillsides

“The road ahead bisects the epic grassy slowe, climbing straight, long and very hard.  With the green banking to the right and the abyss-like valley to the left the rider is dwarfed by the incredible scenery as the road rises to a right-hand bend,”  Simon Warren (100 Greatest Cycling Climbs, A Road Cyclist’s Guide to Britains Hills, p. 139).

aerial drone views of bright green grasses on the mountainside

CyclingUphill.com writes of this climb:

“I rode Newlands House Pass in 2011, shortly after Honister Pass, so it felt like the hills were coming thick and fast. It is on the route of Fred Whitton Challenge, so many will have done a similar route. It is quite exposed and very quiet up there. It is quite inaccessible. There is a tricky descent from Newlands House, I remember nearly coming off on some loose gravel. The road will take you towards Braithwaite, where you can continue the Fred Whitton route over Whinlatter Pass.

From Buttermere there is a sharp rise away from the Lake. The middle section affords some respite before the final segment towards the top. Here it is persistently steep around 12-18%. Like many Lake District climbs, the hardest part is reserved for the end of the climb, where your legs are most tired” (
Read More).

climb end at the Moss Force Waterfall, green grass, sheep grazing on roadside

Climb ends at Newlands Pass in sight of Moss Force Waterfall.

4.8 of 5 Google Ranking on 537 Reviews as of September 2022.

This climb is in the central western section of Lake District National Park, 236,200 hectare (583,663 acres) established in 1951:

bike parked in green grass next to National Trust sign

“The Lake District, also known as the Lakes or Lakeland, is a mountainous region in North West England. A popular holiday destination, it is famous for its lakes, forests and mountains (or fells) and its associations with the early 19th century writings of William Wordsworth and the other Lake Poets, Beatrix Potter, and John Ruskin. A National Park was established in 1951 and, following a minor extension in 2016, now covers an area of approximately 2,362 square kilometres. It was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2017.

It is located entirely within the county of Cumbria, and all the land in England higher than 3,000 feet (914 m) above sea level lies within the National Park, including Scafell Pike, the highest mountain in England. It also contains the deepest and longest bodies of water in England, respectively Wast Water and Windermere,” (
Wikipedia - Lake District National Park).

bike parked on road side next to sign for 20% grade

Finish at Newlands Pass and Moss Force Waterfall.

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